Tag Archives: omaha beach

Veteran: Ernie Corvese

On D-Day, Ernie Corvese landed on Omaha Beach and had not returned to Normandy since.

His demolition team was among the first to arrive on the Normandy coastline and were sent to destroy hedgehogs (X-shaped beach obstacles) that the Germans had littered along the beaches.

IMG_1419He visited Normandy for the first time in 70 years this June and we spoke to him at the Band of Brothers signing in Bayeux.


More to follow…

Follow me on Twitter @AnnieCDarling and use the hashtag #anniesddayblog to share your thoughts, images and videos with me!

Advertisements

#DDay70: Pointe du Hoc

70 years ago, the Rangers climbed the brutal cliffs at Pointe du Hoc before taking the high ground between the American Omaha and Utah beaches.

The German guns that were stationed at Pointe du Hoc killed almost half of the Rangers before they reached the 30-meter cliffs. The original landing force of 225 men had been reduced to only 90 by the time Pointe du Hoc was secured.

Follow me on Twitter @AnnieCDarling and use the hashtag #anniesddayblog to share your thoughts, images and videos with me.

70th D-Day commemorations on Omaha Beach

Last year I wrote about Omaha Beach which can be viewed here.

The beach is located between Vierville and Colleville-sur-Mer, so if you find yourself nearby I would recommend you visit this very moving site.

Omaha Beach is arguably the most well-known of Normandy’s beaches. It was here that American troops suffered huge losses. The RAF had bombed the area intensely in the nights prior to the 6th June, however most German defenses had not be destroyed.

To mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day, on the 7th June there will be a parade of UNIVEM military vehicles on Omaha Beach. This will be followed in the evening by a giant picnic on the seafront, in addition to a Liberation Ball featuring The Glenn Project Big Band. Afterwards, Les Moulinex will play 1940’s music and french post-war songs before the release of sky lanterns at 11pm.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Follow me on Twitter @AnnieCDarling and use the hashtag #anniesddayblog to share your thoughts, images and videos with me!

Longues-sur-Mer battery

Last year, Kate and I visited Longues-sur-Mer with an American tour group. Just outside of Arromanches enroute to Bayeux, if you’re in the area, stop off to take a look for the 70th anniversary of D-Day.

I’d done some research about the battery and so I was excited to be going. Longues-sur-Mer battery was built as part of the German Atlantic Wall and boasts four massive navy guns – a very impressive sight. The scale of the guns really brought home the terror and destruction that they could cause. Each of the guns are protected by a 3-metre thick concrete casemate and has its own command post, shelters for personnel and ammunition storage.

This battery was a coastal fortification that had hardly been damaged by the allied bombing prior to D-Day. Looking at the thick concrete, it’s not hard to understand why. Being still intact when D-Day arrived, Longues-sur-Mer wrecked havoc on Omaha and Gold beach.

Follow me on Twitter @AnnieCDarling and use the hashtag #anniesddayblog to share your thoughts, images and videos with me!